Reducing writer errors

One of the most consistent responses I have received to my posts on revision as waste (Improving First Run Quality, and Revision, Waste, and Evenness) is some variant of “mistakes happen”. Some felt I was blaming writers, or even questioning their integrity. (Such comments were much more prevalent on LinkedIn than on the blog itself.)

Actually, this has very little to do with either the integrity or the diligence of individual writers. Writers are human, and they do make mistakes. The problem is that they tend to work in environments that make mistakes more likely, and that make discovering them less likely. If we want to reduce waste in the content creation process, we should be looking not at individual writers, but at the process and environment in which they work. read more

Why My Titles Suck

Last week I wrote a post on why people have few nice things to say about their CMS. I titled it Content Management and the Problem of Scale. That title sucks. I mean really, who but a handful of content management geeks would be inspired to read a blog post titled Content Management and the Problem of Scale? What was I thinking?

The Importance of Feedback to CMS Health

The transition from DTP to structured writing continues to be a bumpy one, and content management issues continue to plague many implementations. In many cases, the content management strategy depends on writers structuring things properly and they fall apart when writers fail to do so. For instance, reuse of chunks of information ought to make translation easier and less expensive, by reducing the amount of text to be translated. But often, chunking presents a problem for translators, as described here, because the chunks turn out not to be as context-independent as they were supposed to be. read more