Writing Excellence Through Domain Awareness

A little while back, Tom Johnson posted an article entitled Seeing things from the perspective of a learner in which he says, “The balance between knowing and not knowing is the tension that undergirds the whole profession of technical writing.”.

I think that is absolutely correct. The point, after all, is to assist the reader on their journey from ignorance to knowledge. I say assist, because this is not a journey that can be accomplished simply be reading. The reader has work to do to integrate their knowledge. They need to get their hands dirty. But a sympathy with the troubles and perils of that path is at very least, highly useful to the writer. read more

What is an “Expert Writer”?

“Hire Expert Writers,” Says Google

That is the title of a post from M2Bespoke about Google’s emphasis on returning reputable content. What is an “expert writer” in this context?

Many of those who have commented on it and passed it around take it to mean expertise in writing. That seems to be the interpretation that the author of the article is making as well:

There’s no doubt you’re experts in your industry, but do you have professional writers within your business to convey that expertise? Google says: if not, why not? read more

One Answer, Many Questions

It is often appealing to think of technical communication as a process of answering user’s questions. The difficulty with this view is that one answer can have many questions. If you answer each of those questions, you would be providing substantially the same answer over and over again.

This is very easy to see on StackOverflow, a question and answer site for programmers. Privileged user of StackOverflow can mark a question as a duplicate of another question. Here’s an example:

A question marked duplicate on StackOverflow.

The question here is “How to check if a variable is a dictionary in python”. This is a question that programmers are going to ask themselves many times. It is a specific instance of a more general question, which is, “how do you check if a variable is of a specific type in Python?” read more

The Difference Between Story and Drama

In our data-driven age, we tend to give short shrift to story. Story tends to get herded off into the ghetto of drama. Story is for amusement; at work we stick to data.

When I wrote my last post, suggesting a switch of terminology from “content” to “story”, many people naturally interpreted story as meaning drama. As Larry Kunz put it, “In technical writing, the story’s hero is your reader, who’s trying to accomplish something or learn something.”

That may be a useful way to think about your tech writing, but it is a definition of story derived from the world of drama. When I talk about story in the world of tech comm (or marketing communication, for the most part) I am not talking about drama, I am talking about general human communication about everything. Because story is not a special preserve of entertainment. It is how we communicate about everything. read more