The Key to Organizing Web Content is Stickiness

Sticky bun.

The stickiest content rises to the top. Image courtesy of Maggie Smith / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The most important thing you can do to organize your Web content so that people can find it is to make it sticky. Making it sticky is more important than categorizing it or placing it in a hierarchy or taxonomy. It is even more important than linking your content set effectively. In fact, if you don’t make it sticky, neither of those other things are likely to matter much.

It is easy to think of the Web as simply a vast ocean of content. But if it were that, it would not work at all. What the Web actually is is a vast index of content. It is not a fixed index, like in a book, but a complex, dynamic, volatile, multi-stream index. For purposes of findability, how your content is organized on the Web comes down to how it appears in that index. And while you can definitely contribute to how it is indexed in small ways, its indexing is largely controlled by others. The Web organizes itself communally. read more

Trust is Essential to Creating Great Docs

My good friend Pamela Clark asks me to comment on

what product development organizations, processes, and structures best support great user-oriented documentation

I’ve commented over on Tom Johnson’s blog that tech pubs organizations tend to make a slow migration through the corporate landscape, and that I believe that the best home for pubs is in the development organization. But I also believe that tech pubs success is all about relationships, and there is more to that than simply the reporting relationship. In the end, if you want to create the conditions to do great work in tech pubs, you have to be valued. read more

Technical Communication is Not a Commodity

The latest attempt by the STC to promote a certification program for technical communications prompts the thought that technical communication is not a commodity.

What does it mean to say that a profession is, or is not, a commodity? A commodity is any good which will provide the same quality and performance no matter which supplier you buy it from. Gasoline is a commodity. Sugar is a commodity. No matter which brand you buy, your car will run just as well and your tea will taste just as sweet.

A profession is a commodity if you will receive substantially the same service no matter which member of the profession you use. Accounting is a commodity. Your books should be substantially the same no matter which accountant prepares them. Technical writing is not like that. Ask two technical writers to write something on the same topic, and the results are apt to be substantially different. read more