The incomplete bridge

In the Top Gear Patagonia Special, the presenters come upon an incomplete bridge and have to construct a ramp to get their cars across. This is a great metaphor for technical communication, and, indeed, communication of all kinds: the incomplete bridge.

Technical communication is often described as a bridge between the expert and the user. But that bridge is always incomplete. The user always has to build the final span that connects the bridge to the bit of ground they are standing on.

This is true for several reasons, the most basic of which is that you have to contextualize any information you receive to your own project in order to act on it confidently and successfully. If the document tells you to push the red button, it is still your job to determine if you are looking at the right device and the right red button, and if your purpose will truly be served by pressing the red button at this time. The document can never entirely ensure that you do not press the wrong button on the wrong device or at the wrong time for the wrong purpose. Only the individual reader can determine those things, and thus only the reader can build the final span of the bridge. read more

Structured Writing and Free Trade

In my last post, I promised I would reveal the unifying idea that I developed for my new book on Structured Writing. This is the post. So what does it have to do with free trade? Mostly it is that I see the same pattern in discussions of free trade that I do in many discussion of structured writing: a failure to focus on the big picture.

Free trade has been pretty much a given for the last several decades with nations and trading blocks negotiating ever freer trade. But of late the virtues of free trade have been called into questions by the Trump/Sanders wing of American politics, which has those of us in Canada, for whom America is our largest trading partner, a little anxious. read more

In Praise of Long-form Content

Yesterday I wrapped up work on my new book on Structured Writing and delivered it to the publisher. There will be more work to do, of course, after the pre-publication review process is complete, but in a broad sense, the book is done. That is, the arc of the book is complete.

Good books have an arc. Finding that arc is one of the great joys of long-form writing. Of course, this blog is about short form writing — about Every Page is Page One topics that serve a single discrete purpose for the reader. But in a sense even a book should fit that mold — should serve a single discrete purpose for the reader. The whole should be more than the sum of the parts. There should be an arc, something the book says that is more than an accumulation of details, and that allows the reader to see the details in a new light — and to act differently and, hopefully, more successfully, in that new light. read more