Tag Archives | writers

Technical Communication is Not a Commodity

The latest attempt by the STC to promote a certification program for technical communications prompts the thought that technical communication is not a commodity. What does it mean to say that a profession is, or is not, a commodity? A commodity is any good which will provide the same quality and performance no matter which […]

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Characteristics of EPPO Topics: Stay on One Level

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Characteristics of an EPPO topic

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Characteristics of an EPPO topicOne of the less obvious but more important characteristics of an Every Page is Page One topic is that it stays on one level. As with the other characteristics I have discussed in this series, being standalone, having a specific limited […]

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Why My Titles Suck

Last week I wrote a post on why people have few nice things to say about their CMS. I titled it Content Management and the Problem of Scale. That title sucks. I mean really, who but a handful of content management geeks would be inspired to read a blog post titled Content Management and the […]

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Every Page is Page One Topics are Everywhere

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series Characteristics of an EPPO topic

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series Characteristics of an EPPO topicAs I have argued previously, Every Page is Page One is the new fact of information seeking behavior. Whether a reader finds information by searching, or by surfing links on other pages, or even by browsing the landing page of a […]

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The Reader is the Enemy

Noz Urbina asks, Is Communication Mired in the Past? Well, yes, obviously. Most of the tech comms world is still making books in FrameMaker. But also no, because the problem is more profound than the words “mired in the past suggest”. People get mired in things through carelessness or misfortune. They want to get out, […]

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Princes of Erudition?

Just back from JoAnn Hackos’ CMS/DITA conference, where it became clear that even in a conference dedicated to a topic-based authoring methodology, most people are still writing books. Certainly, they are writing them in the form of topics, but then stitching them together into books. The fundamental product is still a book. (more…)

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