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Search ranking and bottom-up architecture

This entry is part 6 of 7 in the series Bottom-Up Information Architecture Q and A

This entry is part 6 of 7 in the series Bottom-Up Information Architecture Q and ADoes a bottom-up information architecture improve search ranking? This is another in a series responding to questions from my TC Dojo series on Bottom-up Information Architecture. I have several questions from the second session on writing, but I’m still working […]

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Any technology you use should be “Googlable”

‘Any technology you use should be “Googlable”‘. These are the words of Bill Scott,  VP Engineering, Merchant | Retail | Online Payments at PayPal, as reported by the amazing Sarah Maddox. (I say amazing because Sarah manages to lucidly and intelligently blog just about every conference session she attends. Having just helped cover the LavaCon conference, and […]

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Hand holding bags and search phone.

Solve First, Buy Afterwards

In, This Is Why It Matters if Your User Guide Is Just an Afterthought, Bill Kerschbaum posits a scenario in which a potential customer, impressed by your glossy website, downloads a trial version of your software, is initially impressed, but then tries to figure out how to do something, is disappointed by the poor user manual and decides not […]

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Lost in the woods

Findability vs. Searchability

I argued in Too Big to Browse; Too Small to Search, that search works best when it has a large amount of content to work with. But it occurs to me that there is a really important caveat to be made, which I can best express as the difference between findability and searchability. The distinction […]

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The Web Does Minimalism

It struck me today that the Web does Minimalism. Not only does it do it, it does it naturally, and it does it well. Consider: Here’s a common listing of the principle tenants of minimalism (borrowed from http://www.ryerson.ca/~ipederse/Minimalism.htm via Google): Take An Action-Oriented Approach Aim for Guided Exploration Position the Documentation in the Task Domain […]

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Upside Down Tree

Websites are Upside Down

The classical structure of a website is that of a tree. The trunk is the homepage. From there you climb the tree, upward and outward until finally you reach the leaves. That is how we design websites. That is how we test websites. It’s just not how we use websites. (more…)

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