Archive | 2013

The Best Job I Ever Had

The best job I ever had spanned the full spectrum of technical communication. In a response to a comment in a discussion related to my post Content Engineering is not Technical Writing, Scott Abel said: Who cares what tech writers do. There’s no future (read: great paying careers) in documenting things. That ship sailed a […]

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Changing the “what” in WYSIWYG

The “what” in “what you see is what you get” is not always “formatting”. Authors need WYSIWYG (What You See is What You Get) displays to work effectively. This is basic ergonomics. If you can’t see the thing you are supposed to be creating, you will have a hard time creating it well. But while authors […]

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I am a Content Engineer

In the closing keynote of the 2013 LavaCon conference, Ann Rockley talked about the rising importance of content engineering in content strategy. A content engineer, Ann explained, is someone with one foot in the technology world and one foot in the content world. Last year I wrote a pair of posts on my hesitation about […]

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Why content jobs are never well defined

Content jobs are never strictly defined because they are the mortar that holds the bricks of the enterprise together. I’m attending LavaCon, and here, as everywhere, content people are debating the definition of their roles, the names of those roles, the boundaries and intersects between them, and the responsibilities and qualifications pertinent to them. Newer […]

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Hand reaching for apple.

Optimize Your Content for Social Curation

We worry a lot about Search Engine Optimization (SEO). I suspect we don’t worry enough about Social Curation Optimization (hereby dubbed SCO). Social curation plays a large role in how people find content on the Web. Google’s Eric Schmidt was recently quoted as saying: Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter also allow users to leverage their social […]

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